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1999 Dakar M3 Coupe Build and Restoration Journal

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  • 1999 Dakar M3 Coupe Build and Restoration Journal

    To be posted

    Page 2

    While I was waiting for bunch of parts to arrive, I decided to cleanup the interior, as it was not missing a lot of stuff (there were some bits that needed to be replaced), but it was mostly just dirty/neglected. Tint went first – I might re-tint the car later, but enjoying clean windows for now!

    I have also identified these areas of attention:

    Parts needed:
    -New shifter knob
    -New floormats
    -New tweeters (dead)
    -New mid-ranges (blown)
    -Light bulbs for OBC
    -Few plastic bits and covers here and there

    Airbag light was on – this was an E36 after all. After scanning codes with my trusty OBD scanner it showed that I needed also the following:

    -Driver-side pre-tensioner
    -Pass. Side occupancy mat

    I decided that I have a better use of my time than to replace occupancy mat sensor, so I just ordered a sensor dummy dongle from eBay. Driver side pre-tensioner was also scored on eBay for $50 shipped which was a decent deal.

    Cleanupt started with taking apart as many panels as I could reasonably take off without breaking and having a rattling bucket after. E36 interiors are known for their terrible plastic pieces, so few tabs had to be repaired here and there. Since no one ever touched this car, even if the piece was broken, it was likely found right next to the panel!

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Most of the interior was pulled out to take the carpet out and steam clean it. Once the carpet was in, I decided to take care of the leather before putting it back in. I have been using Leatherique with great success for years now, and all leather surfaces got treated with Rejuvenator twice.

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Easy when you have shit out:

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    The stuff is really amazing. Makes leather look and feel brand new.

    by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    I had some pretty severe wrinkling on drivers seat, which was made quite a bit better by Leatherique, but leather lost some of its black dye, and both cushion and seat-back bolsters had to be re-dyed – used Fiebings black oil dye and their terrific balm with Atom wax to finish off:

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Seat looks great:

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    I have also cleaned the steering wheel stitching and conditioned the leather:

    IMG_7147 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    IMG_7148 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    IMG_7149 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Most other leather surfaces got leatherique treatment was well:

    IMG_7145 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    IMG_7144 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Funny bit – I was finding coins everywhere! Lodged between the seats and central console, under seats, ashtray, between rear seats, etc. This is the car I have found the most money in – I got $13.76 cents in various coins:

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    While the seats were out, I also replaced the pre-tensioner and put in dummy seat occupancy mat sensor. All mechanisms and wires/connectors were also cleaned, lubed, and vacuumed:

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Steam-cleaned carpet in before the seat install:

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    OBC lights were fixed:

    IMG_7143 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr:

    New shifter is on:

    IMG_7142 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    New floormats:

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Both tweeters and mid-ranges in door panels were blown and making this terrible screeching sound. I considered doing BavSound upgrade for some time, but then I realized that don’t really care for their overpriced kit when all I really need is a pair of tweeters and mid-ranges. Sure, the install would not be plug in play, but the cost…

    Tweeters and mid-ranges were acquired from Amazon for the total cost of whopping $38 all together shipped. They are no-name POS, but these are better than what was in the car anyway!

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Factory tweets were taken apart:

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Same size really:

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Speaker was simply glued in with hot-glue:

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Then I also hot-glue the backing plate to hold it in place, and soldered factory connector to the wiring for easy hook-up:

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Looks perfect and sounds great!

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Midranges looked pretty sad when I took them out:

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    In a similar fashion, I re-soldered factory connection to the replacement speaker (which was slightly smaller in diameter than original, so I had to fashion small coupling rings):

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    And hot-glued inside the factory housing:

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Certainly looks like HK speaker to me

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Dakar M3 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Installed into door panels. These sound great to my taste. Not powerful, but compliment HK woofers well.

    DSC_0345* by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0335* by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    I’m still waiting on the coinbox (was backordered and freaking $50!) and a glove box button (which I didn’t realize was broken), but overall, the interior is done.

    DSC_0344* by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0333* by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0326* by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0338* by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0341* by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0340* by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0346* by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0349* by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0347* by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0352* by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0350* by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0329* by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Glovebox is sagging a bit, will address this when button shows up. Thanks for reading this enormously long post!

    Page 4

    My first ever M car and the one that I will never sell – a 2000 S52 M Coupe in Cosmos Black over black, currently at 110K miles, had it for close to 15 years. Pretty awesome little ball of hate – so similar to E36 mechanically, but a completely different beast on the inside. My most modded car – B&B Exhaust, Bilstein/H&R all around, AKG Urethane all around, reinforced everything, CAI, Shark tune, etc – looks mostly stock though, except for ride height. Absolutely bonkers car. Completely restored and gets driven couple times a month.

    Imagecoupe006 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr
    ImageDSC_0034_2 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr
    ImageDSC_0042_2 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Getting a wash:

    Imagem coupe by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Next I have a 2006 M6 SMG Coupe in Indianapolis Red/Black. My daily – scary fast, S85 is a screamer, very competent cruiser. 11mpg in the city, 6mpg if you get on it. No mods but for style 343 OEM wheels. Beautiful car.

    ImageIMG_7559 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    ImageUntitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    2003 E46 M3 SMG Coupe in Carbon Black/Cinnamon – favorite M-car. Completely restored back to original glory by me an my kiddo with a few OEM+ mods. Telepathic steering and suspension, reliable, spacious, agile, scary fast. And that engine! What a jewel. S54 is absolutely intoxicating powerplant. Terrific all-around car.

    ImageM316 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr
    ImageM307 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr
    ImageOther02 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr
    ImageM304 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr
    ImageInterior01 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr


    And my final addition (got this just few weeks ago, after I bought E36 m3) is another beast known to all – 2000 E39 M5 Imola Red/Black heritage leather. The car is currently undergoing the same type restoration that I’m doing to the M3. Heavy car, but the engine makes it quick. Not as agile or nimble as M3s or smaller cars, but it is a torque monster and very capable car in its own right. Still sorting it through, suspension is not properly refreshed yet (111K miles on it) so not a lot of driving impressions yet. Beautiful car, always wanted one – lucked out and picked it up locally! Keeping (restoring) this one close to stock as well.

    ImageIMG_6606 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr
    ImageIMG_6600 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Just after I brought it home – cleaning up!

    ImageUntitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    ImageUntitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    My wifes car is the only brand new car we own – she does not want to do anything with old cars :-) She drives 2017 Alpine/Cognac 640i Gran Coupe.

    ImageIMG_2666 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Car shuffling is a problem when I need to get certain car out of the garage!

    ImageIMG_5229 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Page 12

    This would probably be the last of the “regular” updates for this thread – at this point I would consider this car is mostly finished, and in the nearest future my plans are to enjoy and drive the hell out of it and just take care of the things that pop up. It is finally up to the standard I want and I fixed, updated, replaced and restored everything that I originally set out to do when I started.

    But before I could post some beauty shots, last update. Mechanically and cosmetically everything was done, except for paint – and it needed help. I had taken it to my PDR guy, and he took out 17 minor dents. This baby is straight as an arrow, not a ding in the body. I have touched up all paint chips. And then it was time to wash, clay, 3-stage paint correction, wax, and sealant.

    Thorough wash, pretty much every crevice was cleaned with tooth/brushes:

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    This was probably 10th time I washed the car, and finally it was clean. If you look at the pictures of the car at the beginning of this thread, and the ones below, you can see how far we’ve come:

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr
    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Clean and ready for paint correction:

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Most of the trim was taped off – I hate to clean up polish residue off the trim pieces:

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Chemical Guys polishes – went mostly with #34 followed by #38, rough spots were worked on with #32.

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Orange cutting pad, ready, set…

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Go!

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Worked all day, paint was in pretty decent shape, but I wanted it perfect. Most likely will not do this again anytime soon, so I did put in some time here. The results were worth it:

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    All black trim was cleaned and treated with back-to-black or whatever the name of the thing is… Gummi Pfledge? Nice and black now.

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Badge is cleaned up, I have also replaced the roundels, but forgot to take a pic!



    Took it out for a nice long drive around town with my son, stopping at different places, taking pix, just hanging and admiring and enjoying our work. He is very proud, said that maybe he will get another E36 M3 for his first car!

    Final set of pictures of completed car. Enjoy.

    DSC_0366 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0371 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0363 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0360 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0356 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0368 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0402 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0388 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0380 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0384 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0369 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0394 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    DSC_0398 by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Thank you all who watched, commented, and read this thread. Will update as I have stuff done to the car!

    Page 18

    Well, the switch showed up yesterday, so I decided to put it in today. What a stupid design! I guess it has to be done that way cause its a critical part, but man....

    Offender:

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Took the panel off:

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    New switch - went with URO cause that's what was on Amazon Prime with free overnight delivery. Lately, if the part is not critical, I skip OEM and go for the one that can be delivered fast. This certainly fit the bill - $13 shipped.

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Got the 4-prong one for the OBC:

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Darn thing didn't want to come out, so I just grabbed it by the plunger and ripped that shit of together with the red collar. Popped right out.

    Untitled by Alex Kustov, on Flickr

    Installation simple, just pop in, done.
    Fixed the light, so let's hope this lasts cause I really didn't like the job - not a lot of room to work there.

    Page 20

    Thanks!

    A tiny update, as I finally scored a decent x-brace on ebay for next to nothing. This was on my list, but I was not willing to pay $250 for this, so I waited. Scored this bad boy few days ago for $80 shipped! Even came with mounting hardware.



    Came with this weird bumper thing, never seen this before. I'm not sure which car this came from, but my M Coupe doesn't have this:



    Anyway, put the car on the lift, pull the brace. Nice and clean original color under the brace. Good.





    Installed new brace without much fuss, looking good! Nice upgrade for not a lot of $$.

    Page 22


    Well, since no one responded, I decided I'll be a guinea pig.
    Sent my old wheel to be re-wrapped to Coby wheel, and it came back couple of days ago.
    I went with black alcantara, tri-color M-stitch, and Dakar 12 O'clock 1/2 inch stripe. Overall, the wheel looks great:



    Couple of words about Cobywheel quality of work - the wrap is very nice, if I didn't know it was re-wrapped, I'd say its a factory job. Though, on the closer inspection, couple of things stood out - the red thread is slightly different shade than OEM, and stitch itself is tiny bit bigger than stock. No big deal really, but wanted to mention. Overall, high quality work.







    Installed the wheel last night - and I really do like the look so far. The wheels is tiny bit fatter than the original (the thickness of the alcantara material, I did not add any extra padding), and feels perfect in your hands. Since I kept the original wheel, I can always swap back, I guess. So overall, pretty happy.







    Page 23

    A little sneak peak - I've always liked how DS2 wheels look on e36 coupe, so I finally assembled a cheap set from various sources that I will completely strip, make sure its straight, and re-finish in the nearest future.



    So, a question to experts - what was the original finish on these wheels? Was it more of a silver clearcoated finish, or was it more like hyper silver, finer and slightly darker than typical silver? Trying to get it re-done close to the original shade/look.

    If you have a good picture of a wheel that has original finish, I'd appreciate it.

    Last week I took the car on a little 150-mile journey to stretch its legs, and on my way back home, I got a check engine light, of course!

    Checked it out with my OBD scanner, and it was upstream oxygen sensor on bank 2.



    Decided it was time to replace both anyway (129K) I ordered couple from Amazon, and they showed up two days later:



    The offender was covered in some oil fluid – probably oil – not sure if this was the culprit of the malfunction:



    Bank one sensor looked just fine:



    Getting the old ones out was relatively easy, though I did spray some PB blaster and used crows foot socket to get them off. Lots of residue on them:



    New ones came nicely packaged:



    With anti-seize already applied to the threads – very thoughtful:



    Both went in without a problem, torqued to spec:





    Cable management:



    Hopefully the new ones will last just as long as the original ones (though, I don’t know if these are truly original).



    Page 24


    The car had developed a slow power steering leak, but it was so small (1-2 drops every now and then) that I put this on the back burner until I had a bit of a free time. I had the parts for some time, but only now did the job.

    As you can see, most of the leakage was at the reservoir – the clamps or the hoses were bad, it was covered with fluid:



    There was also some evidence of the leak at the PS cooler hose – the clamp likely the culprit here:



    Got replacement Meyle parts from FCP, picked up the high pressure line just in case, but turned out it was completely dry – so left it as is for now – I’m sure it will start leaking at some point!



    Took the airbox off to gain access to reservoir clamp – quite a bit of dirt under it!



    Unhooked the lines, and drained the fluid. Couldn’t reach the cooler line clamp, so I just sliced the hose and took the reservoir out from the top:



    There will be some fluid there still – use a towel:



    Installation is pretty straightforward – I did put pump hose on the reservoir before putting it back on and secured with a good old hose clamp:



    New cooler installed. A word of caution – Meyle part does not fit 100% from the box, and requires a bit of a twist to line up with the mounting holes. Also, one of the ears that was tack welded to the pipe broke off when I was installing it – so, not a very good quality part. It still works just fine, but more on this later:



    Connected the return hose, clamped the reservoir. As you can see, high pressure line is bone dry, so left it as is for now.



    Re-filled with fluid:



    Reinstalled the airbox and tested – no leaks. Good.

    While I was under the car though, noticed that my front sway bar bushings were getting toast, so decided to address that as well.





    Quick trip to the dealer to get the bushings:



    Cleaned off the brackets a bit (not the best job, but I was impatient, and it was freaking hot in the garage:



    Much better:





    The stable is out while the E36 is on the operating table (aka lift):



    Since I was so disappointed with the quality of the Meyle cooler line, I decided to salvage the original part – the metal piece was still in good shape, so I drained the fluid and cleaned it off:



    Dremel with a cutoff disk is the best tool to remove those pressure clamps:



    Made two slits with the Dremel on the sides of the clamp:



    And it literally fell apart:



    And what do we have here? Nice and clean pipe ready for some new hose and good old-fashioned hose clamp:



    1 foot of ½ inch PS hose and set of clamps from Autozone:



    And we are back in business:



    Hard day work at the garage, calls for a good dinner. Lambchops with corn on the cob and some Portobello mushroom on the grill:



    Looking good!



    Took the car to work next day to test the PS job – everything works great and no more leaks. Came to the garage to find this – yellow cars stick together!




    Page 25

    Finally, an update on this puppy - and it’s a big one. Well, sort of – couple of things that I wanted to do for a long time and finally found the time to do.

    Even though the headliner in my car was just fine when I bought it, Texas heat does wonderful things to 20-year old foam backing, and after a couple of summers, I regrettably saw this one day:

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Well, poop. Sucks but what are you going to do.

    So I went online looking for a company that would ship me some original BMW headliner fabric, found Veteran Co via the forum, but their ordering system is a nightmare, plus they didn’t have it in stock, so I gave up.

    Found some BM134 fabric at Euro Auto Interiors, and was able to order online. Came out a bit more than Veteran at $50 per yard, but the convenience of online ordering and the fact they had it in stock made up for it.

    So I yanked the headliner out:

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Luckily my sunroof still looked fine, though not sure for how much longer, but we’ll cross that bridge then:

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Didn’t realize sunroof cassette was sooo huge!

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Removing headliner turned out to be not that big of a deal, and it slid out the door with seats laid flat quite easily. Lots of stuff to take off (and keep track of hardware), but not complicated:

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    As suspected, the foam completely gave, and the entire headliner was just peeling off easily:

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Even the spots around the visors shrunk and started bubbling:

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    But what can you expect from over 20-year old dachverkleidung? Ja, ja…

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Meanwhile, the fabric arrived, and it was time to get to work. Nice foam backed roll:

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    I’d say it was spot on texture and color wise (original headliner was probably sun bleached some):

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    I ordered 2 yards, and it was enough to do the headliner with some extra material remaining:

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    So, with all necessary supplies ready, me and a friend of mine tacked the job of re-upholstery. Most of the foam remained on the headliner board after fabric removal:

    Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Removal of the foam sucks, as the dust flies everywhere, wear dust mask:

    Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Does not take long with proper tools, but it’s a tedious job:

    Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    All cleaned up:

    Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Spraying the glue on the board:

    Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Headliner board covered in glue – drying:

    Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Measure the fabric, cut to size, spray one side of the fabric with glue – let sit for 5 minutes:

    Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Repeat for the other side:

    Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    And then gently press the fabric into the board, carefully stretching it and wrapping all of the curves. The glue that I used is DAP contact cement, and it is completely dry to the touch, but instantly chemically bonds when two painted surfaces pressed together. Really cool stuff and wonderful to work with. Rated at 170F, so hopefully I won’t have to re-do this until the foam fails again in 20 years.

    Once the fabric was glued to the board, I flipped it and started trimming the back side and cutting holes:

    Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Doesn’t look pretty, but who cares:

    Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Tada!

    Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Turned out real good:

    Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    I purposely started early in the morning as it gets hot by 10am and it was getting hot by the time we were done. So I continued to work and put that sucker in:

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    You can still see some indentations from where I was pressing with my fingers on the foam while installing it in the pictures, since I took them right after putting it in. All straightened out after couple of hours in the heat! So overall, pretty happy to get that done and not worry about the headliner for some time.

    But not all was good, as when I lowered the drivers’ seat to get the headliner in, I heard some unpleasant noise when reclining the back, and sure enough when headliner was in, I couldn’t put the seat back up. I heard the motor attempting to spin, but nothing. And it was fully reclined. Well, crap.

    Pulled the seat up, took the motors off, and yanked the gearbox cover off:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Bah…what do we see here:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    A 20-year-old plastic gear broken into tiny plastic pieces! Nice!

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    4 pieces, actually:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Disappointed that my new headliner test-drive would have to wait, I pulled the gearbox off the seat:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Removed the worm shaft, unclipped c-clamp, removed and cleaned the bearings:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    To no ones surprise, BMW does not make or sell the gears by themselves. Duh! To no ones surprise again, Amazon had plenty in stock from at least 4 different Chinese manufacturers. Since it was already past noon, same day delivery was not an option, so I ordered a gear, and decided that drinking beer for the rest of the day was way more attractive proposition.

    Two days later, the gear in an unmarked yellow envelope was delivered to my mailbox:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Looked a bit smaller than I thought, but the thread pitch seemed fine:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    The problem was that the shaft wouldn’t fit into the gear. Forum posts suggested hammering the shaft into the gear with some lube. Half way in, I honestly thought it was going to split:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    A little more…still not there though:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    And finally the sucker was on and secured by the clamp:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Re-installed the shaft into the gearbox:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Re-packed with grease:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Put the cover and service hole plug back on:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    In retrospect, I should not have removed the gearbox off the seat, as re-installation in the car with unsecured seat back flipping back and forth was a nightmare. So I took the seat out:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    What a [email protected] nightmare…But finally it went back on and all assembled ready to go back into the car:

    Untitled by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    While the seat was out, I cleaned up the interior. Found 50 cents.

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Finally, the seat was back in and fully operational:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Time for a beer.

    On a separate note, I got new wheels and tires for the car. Few months ago I picked up a neglected and beat up set of DS2 (style 39) wheels which I happen to like a lot, and had them re-finished along with a spare set of style 40 “Roadstars” for my M Coupe:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Waiting and looking at its new shoes:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    The wheels turned out fantastic:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Untitled by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    After putting the new kicks on, took it for some gas:

    Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    Finally, a nice hand wash, and back into garage:

    Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

    That’s it for today fellas. Will try to take some new “beauty” pictures sometime soon. Need to try out that new 200mm lens!

    Cheers!

    Page 27



    Lift is a life saver - space-wise and also work-wise. I have been able to do some jobs that I would not have even attempted if not for the lift. Pretty much paid for itself in just a few months I had it. Seriously thinking about putting in second one if I can fit it.


    Not really an update, just a few pics of a clean car with the new wheels:






























  • #2
    This is obviously a dump from the M3F and far from complete, so give me a few days to sort through it and fill in the blanks. I'll reserve a few posts to do this.

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    • #3
      Reserved for cleanup

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      • #4
        Reserved for cleanup 2

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        • #5
          Reserved for cleanup 3

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          • #6
            Reserved for cleanup 4

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            • #7
              Reserved for cleanup 5

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              • #8
                I always enjoy your threads, Alex. Attention to detail is an understatement.

                Past: '99 Hellrot/Dove M3/2/5 | '97 S14 1JZ | '06 Triumph Daytona 675 | '01 330I M-Tech I | Current: '96 Estoril/Black M3/2/5

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mike0032 View Post
                  I always enjoy your threads, Alex. Attention to detail is an understatement.
                  Thank you - I appreciate it!

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                  • #10
                    Garage goals!

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