Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Visceral M3 | My Estoril E36 M3/2/5 Journal

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I’ve found myself about 75% finished with about half a dozen projects lately, one of which being that I rebuilt the rear calipers months ago and chose to do the fronts at a later date. The parts have just been sitting in a box with the To-Do list in my phone growing and growing. I decided this weekend would be a good one to get back to business and finish the other half of that project.

    Although I have no issues with my calipers sticking, I have even pad wear, and no other general issues, I primarily wanted to get rid of the red paint and also ensure that everything in the car is new and fresh. I’d rather have peace of mind knowing it’s new and good to go than wondering how long it’ll be before a problem arises. As they say, preventative maintenance is cheaper than repairing something that is broken.



    Here’s what the calipers started as. A couple years of aggressive and dusty track pads coupled with some lackluster red paint.



    After a quick sandblast. I’m not against leaving them in this original color but the black paint will hide the ever building brake dust a bit better, not that it’ll make much difference.



    Bores cleaned, pistons cleaned, new seals, new bleeders, and new guide housings. It would be cool to paint the ///M in the tri-color but for now I’d just rather wrap this project up.



    Cruising the forums I came across a set of TC Kline Double Adjustable coilovers that I immediately hopped on. Supposedly they come from a genuine LTW car that was trailered to and from events, never seeing any actual road miles. I believe it, they showed up looking nearly brand new. I reached out to True Choice for a quote on a full rebuild as these are Koni based and decided since they look so good and no visible issues, I’ll save that for a later date assuming I don’t find any issues after driving on them.




    Here’s an apparently ancient photo of the car that they came off of.



    500 pound springs for the front, 550 for the rear. Should be good for a car that still sees plenty of street time and 200TW tires.



    TC Klines rear spring perches are interesting. They imply that you can run them on either the top of the bottom, however I chose to run them on the top so they can be adjusted easier when I get to corner balancing the car. However the threaded portion that seats on the rear “knub” doesn’t fully seat flush with the chassis, as you see here:




    I reached out to them and they said that this is fine and that I shouldn’t worry. Still, it seems a bit odd, so I looked into getting some alignment cones or articulating spring perches. However the coil springs tighten toward the bottom meaning I couldn’t put anything in there to help locate the spring. Although this photo below is at “full decompression” and that’s unlikely to happen while driving, it just seems like that spring perch isn’t far off from unseating completely. The springs and perches that were coupled with the BC coilovers sat flush against the top.




    All bolted in with the freshly rebuilt calipers, ready to go.



    I will apparently need new sway bar end links for the front, however. The ones that were bolted to my BC’s were far shorter.



    TCK’s camber plates are pretty slick in that you can adjust both camber and caster. I’m looking forward to getting this thing on the alignment rack and to start playing with the settings.


    Past: '99 Hellrot/Dove M3/2/5 | '97 S14 1JZ | '06 Triumph Daytona 675 | '01 330I M-Tech I | Current: '96 Estoril/Black M3/2/5

    Instagram

    Comment


    • #17
      I'll repeat what I said on BFc here; that roll bar setup came out amazing.

      Good choice on the TCK kit. Such a superb setup on the E36 M3. I'm ordering an S/A setup soon for mine.

      Did you know that in 1996, the M3 only came in Coupe and only in Manual? Your sig doesn't need the /2/5 😋 We also need to get you the correct nose panel and kidneys. That facelift panel doesn't do the car justice.


      MSportParts | Braymond141

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Braymond141 View Post
        I'll repeat what I said on BFc here; that roll bar setup came out amazing.

        Good choice on the TCK kit. Such a superb setup on the E36 M3. I'm ordering an S/A setup soon for mine.

        Did you know that in 1996, the M3 only came in Coupe and only in Manual? Your sig doesn't need the /2/5 😋 We also need to get you the correct nose panel and kidneys. That facelift panel doesn't do the car justice.

        Thanks Brett. I'm excited to get the TCK's all dialed in. I need to set the ride height and make some adjustable sway bar end links before I can get going.

        Didn't know that about the 96! When I originally bought this car I ordered the OEM nose panel through my local dealer using my VIN thinking they'd give me the pre-facelift piece. Much to my dismay when I actually got my hands on it a few weeks later that it was the later style. Sad. I've got a lot of cosmetic work I'd like to do on the car, but it'll be down the road a bit.

        Past: '99 Hellrot/Dove M3/2/5 | '97 S14 1JZ | '06 Triumph Daytona 675 | '01 330I M-Tech I | Current: '96 Estoril/Black M3/2/5

        Instagram

        Comment


        • #19
          I started wrapping up another project that I've been working on forever; the front door panels. I had completely stripped them of their material and re-glued a similar vinyl on them. The first attempt of doing it with one piece and some strong glue and heat didn't work so this forced me to do something less than ideal. Here you can see the failed one piece attempt, it created a lot of wrinkles in the material.



          I really wanted this to be done in one piece but I just couldn't figure out a way to do it with something that would look right and, most importantly, hold up long term. The only way to resist the fabric stretching and pulling against the fiberboard was to cut out a separate piece with lots of slack so that it wasn't fighting the adhesive. I laid out a big piece and started marking the pockets.



          Cut pocket pieces with slack to wrap underneath and adhere to the backs.



          It ended up looking like this, except the pocket for the door handle area was also cut out as well.



          This picture below shows how short the fabric falls when cut out of a flat piece, that's a lot of stretch to do in one piece, just too much.



          Once I had my big piece laid out and the templates for the pockets done I handed them over to my local seamstress to run though his machine in a subtle black thread.




          And so begins the long process of hand brushing on the contact adhesive in small portions and adhering the fabric to the fiberboard. I think the first door took me 3-4 hours just in doing the big piece. It takes patience to make sure everything lays as it should, the adhesive is very strong and you don't get a second chance to reposition the material once it's down.



          All done. There was some small wrinkling in some of the corners, the material isn't as forgiving to work with like a vinyl wrap. Luckily the wrinkling is hidden in the corners that won't be visible once installed in the car.



          The next stop was to glue in the pockets. Again, this is tricky to align because the adhesive will not let go once it touches each other. I delicately glued both pockets and the door handle pocket in.



          The final stage was to stitch the pieces together onto the big main piece, again a slow and diligent process. Overall I'm happy in knowing that my map pockets will never fail again. I'm not super thrilled on the fact that I now have stitching on my door panels but this is the only option I can think of aside from ordering the expensive replacements that will inevitably fail again, probably sooner than later in the hot Texas summers. The light in these photos accent the stitching to show the detail and the process, however in person they're more subdued. We'll see how they look once they're mounted in the car, hopefully a bit less obvious.



          I just need to glue the plastic pocket pieces and clip mounting brackets back onto the rear and finish the arm rest portions, then I can finally put them in the car and see how they look.
          I think my next focus, after the door panels, needs to be to finish my rear seat delete so I can get the roll bar in the car so it quits collecting dust in the back of the shop.

          Past: '99 Hellrot/Dove M3/2/5 | '97 S14 1JZ | '06 Triumph Daytona 675 | '01 330I M-Tech I | Current: '96 Estoril/Black M3/2/5

          Instagram

          Comment


          • #20
            Haven't done much with the car lately but planning to devote some time tomorrow to knock some things out. In the meantime, here are some photos from the last time I drove the car about a month ago.
            IMG_3533 by Mike Ellington, on Flickr
            IMG_3534 by Mike Ellington, on Flickr
            IMG_3514 by Mike Ellington, on Flickr
            IMG_3500 by Mike Ellington, on Flickr
            IMG_3497 by Mike Ellington, on Flickr
            IMG_3485 by Mike Ellington, on Flickr

            Past: '99 Hellrot/Dove M3/2/5 | '97 S14 1JZ | '06 Triumph Daytona 675 | '01 330I M-Tech I | Current: '96 Estoril/Black M3/2/5

            Instagram

            Comment

            Working...
            X