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Need help removing a reversed torx bolt on the transmission bellohousing.

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  • Need help removing a reversed torx bolt on the transmission bellohousing.

    So the top reversed torx bolt located at the very top is not loosening. It is way overtight and it is not loosening-up; therefore it stripped.
    I have used a combination of smaller (E13) socket and a bolt extractor to no avail. My only choice is to cut the other half.
    My question is can I get to that bolt by dropping the front subframe? I have read that getting to the bolt is easier by removing the intake manifold, but that is a bitch job.
    Attached is a pic (Not the actual) of the bolt’s location

  • #2
    The transmission to engine mounting bolt? By reversed, you mean reverse threaded? I don't recall any of those being reverse threaded.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by JitteryJoe View Post
      The transmission to engine mounting bolt? By reversed, you mean reverse threaded? I don't recall any of those being reverse threaded.
      Sorry, was typing as my wife was talking to me. It’s the inverted torx bolt, that uses E14 socket.

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      • #4
        The one you point to in your picture looks like a standard M21x50 torx bolt. There is just one weird bolt in the transmission mount, that is the M6x12 hex head bolt that is installed in the opposite direction of the other torx bolts. I believe there are 9 torx mounting bolts of various sizes that all install from the transmission bell housing into the engine block (2 into the starter).

        https://www.realoem.com/bmw/enUS/sho...diagId=23_1265

        You can tilt the back side of the engine down if the transmission mount is removed. The top bolts are a pain to reach. You really need very long socket extensions. You have the correct size torx socket? I don't recall the correct size (you say E14). Is the head of the bolt stripped from using the wrong size socket? Not sure if you are saying the threads are stripped, the bolt is stuck, or you cannot grip the bolt.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by JitteryJoe View Post
          The one you point to in your picture looks like a standard M21x50 torx bolt. There is just one weird bolt in the transmission mount, that is the M6x12 hex head bolt that is installed in the opposite direction of the other torx bolts. I believe there are 9 torx mounting bolts of various sizes that all install from the transmission bell housing into the engine block (2 into the starter).

          https://www.realoem.com/bmw/enUS/sho...diagId=23_1265

          You can tilt the back side of the engine down if the transmission mount is removed. The top bolts are a pain to reach. You really need very long socket extensions. You have the correct size torx socket? I don't recall the correct size (you say E14). Is the head of the bolt stripped from using the wrong size socket? Not sure if you are saying the threads are stripped, the bolt is stuck, or you cannot grip the bolt.
          I got it out bro. Used a smaller bolt extractor, hammered it in and voila. SOB was way over tight by the factory.
          It is an E14 socket. I checked 3 times. I read in the manual and read several threads about it.
          There are three different bolt sizes. The heck would they do that for?
          Last edited by Positiveions; 06-15-2020, 11:11 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Positiveions View Post

            I got it out bro. Used a smaller bolt extractor, hammered it in and voila. SOB was way over tight by the factory.
            It is an E14 socket. I checked 3 times. I read in the manual and read several threads about it.
            There are three different bolt sizes. The heck would they do that for?
            It probably wasn't overtightened. There are a number of contributors to a failed removal. Improper seating of the Etorx. You HAVE to make sure it is fully engaged. If the tip of the socket isn't touching the flange of the bolt, you're doing it wrong. Also, extension twist. The more extensions you use, the more deflection you add, especially with 3/8 and non-impact grade. Proper extensions means more turning effort goes into the fastener and isn't absorbed by the spring in the tools.

            MSportParts | Braymond141

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Braymond141 View Post

              It probably wasn't overtightened. There are a number of contributors to a failed removal. Improper seating of the Etorx. You HAVE to make sure it is fully engaged. If the tip of the socket isn't touching the flange of the bolt, you're doing it wrong. Also, extension twist. The more extensions you use, the more deflection you add, especially with 3/8 and non-impact grade. Proper extensions means more turning effort goes into the fastener and isn't absorbed by the spring in the tools.
              Interesting. Thanks.
              Onto completing the job.

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              • #8
                Point of order though - impact sockets and extensions use softer steel than quality non-impact, impact extensions will twist more than a non-impact one. If they used hard-arse steel they'd destroy everything they impacted... or shatter. The exact reasons you don't use a non-impact socket with an impact driver.

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