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FCAB installed left on jack stands

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  • FCAB installed left on jack stands

    Installed new FCABs on 95M3 and have now learned car should be lowered within about 30 minutes of completing job. Car is still on jack stands. Should I remove and reinstall (that would be something to look forward to)? Thanks

  • #2
    I’m sure it will be fine and the control arm side will twist in the CAB once in the ride height position.

    Car in the air, mark the arm and bushing to monitor the clocking of the arm inside the CAB. Go drive 20-50 miles. Hopefully you see it repositioned. If not, then remove, reinstall with dish soap and get it on the ground asap.

    MSportParts | Braymond141

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    • #3
      Will do. Thanks for excellent directions!

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      • #4
        This worked out. Could see paint mark moved about 6-8mm and have settled in. Excellent solution. Thanks

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        • #5
          Future info. BMW used to use a factory lube for the FCAB (and other components, too) that was part kerosene and part something else. This lubed the rubber for installation, allowed the bushing to 'normalize' when placed back on the ground and the petroleum component of the lube allowed the rubber to bond to the control arm after evaporation for a no-slip fit. Not used any longer. Most now use a lubricant called P-80 rubber lube that evaporates afterward and leaves a tight rubber to metal fit. The original stuff had a wait time of about 2-3 hours, P-80 takes about an hour.
          Last edited by m3fan; 05-30-2020, 04:49 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by m3fan View Post
            Future info. BMW used to use a factory lube for the FCAB (and other components, too) that was part kerosene and part something else. This lubed the rubber for installation, allowed the bushing to 'normalize' when placed back on the ground and the petroleum component of the lube allowed the rubber to bond to the control arm after evaporation for a no-slip fit. Not used any longer. Most now use a lubricant called P-80 rubber lube that evaporates afterward and leaves the rubber to metal a tight fit. The original stuff had a wait time of about 2-3 hours, P-80 takes about an hour.
            I always wondered what that goop was. Good info!

            MSportParts | Braymond141

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            • #7
              Hadn't heard about P-80 which is available on amazon (what isn't?). Bit confused though, as the idea of the bushing bonding to the control arm seems opposite of the poly bushing i've seen that simple slide on i would assume can rotate. ???

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              • #8
                Originally posted by nalasivad View Post
                Hadn't heard about P-80 which is available on amazon (what isn't?). Bit confused though, as the idea of the bushing bonding to the control arm seems opposite of the poly bushing i've seen that simple slide on i would assume can rotate. ???
                Whole different animal with poly. I'm not a fan. Making a bonded part like the stock bushing is not as easy as making poly bushings that slip on even though they usually cost more, everyone has them and they affect ride quality (depending on what you're looking for). BMW subscribes to a certain handling and road feel with their cars. I think poly doesn't cut it in that respect. You could just skip the poly and go to a ball-and-socket arrangement for that particular application, too.

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                • #9
                  I went with stock. Just wondering why in one case the bushing is to bond to the control arm and in the other it doesn't need to.

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