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  • FIrewall Heatshield Material

    All- I am a little confused with RealOEM diagrams as there appears to be a few layers of either sound deadening/insulation/heat-shielding that is hard to distinguish. In any event, below is a picture in my engine bay next to the transmission tunnel and where the mid-pipes join the headers. The material is clearly sagging and resting on the pipes....

    The question is which one is it and is it easy to swap out?


    Attached Files
    BMW parts 3' E36 M3 Sound insulating front

  • #2
    The firewall shield and the transmission tunnel insulation are one piece. To replace you need to replace all of it. Many folks just cut away the transmission tunnel insulation and replace it will something like dynashield (SP?) stick on or the like. You can also use one of the transmission insulation brackets to add support. I think Brett sells one.

    I replaced the whole piece when I pulled my engine and transmission. To do it right you have to strip all the stuff off the firewall. It is not a small job.

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    • #3
      Dang it. I was afraid of that. I guess the next question is if there are alternative aftermarket solutions you would recommend that are adhesive back. I think at this point, I will just have to cut away the areas that are sagging and replace it with ones I can just stick on there.

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      • #4
        I went with this stuff:
        https://www.summitracing.com/parts/DEI-050502 and https://www.summitracing.com/parts/DEI-010408

        Its nowhere near as effective as the stock material but it helps.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jayjaya29 View Post
          I went with this stuff:
          https://www.summitracing.com/parts/DEI-050502 and https://www.summitracing.com/parts/DEI-010408

          Its nowhere near as effective as the stock material but it helps.
          Thanks for the recommendation. What do you mean in terms of effectiveness? Was noise levels, temperature, adhesion or all of the above?

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          • #6
            I think the BMW insulation is more noise shield than heat shield for the transmission tunnel. How bad is yours sagging? Would a bracket solve the issue? Some folks have used Dynamat (dynamat.com) but I don't know how it holds up over time.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by JitteryJoe View Post
              I think the BMW insulation is more noise shield than heat shield for the transmission tunnel. How bad is yours sagging? Would a bracket solve the issue? Some folks have used Dynamat (dynamat.com) but I don't know how it holds up over time.
              Dynamat's applications aren't really for high heat areas.

              Existing stuff has already been sagging on the exhaust headers for some time. Just tried to pull it away and ended up tearing away a small chunk. Are there any threads or fasteners near that area that I can even secure a bracket too? Brett sells brackets for the sound insulation sag that is common behind the transmission area that is secured via the transmission mounts. However, there isn't a solution for what is ahead of it (hint hint Brett time to invent something novel :-))

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bmwstephen View Post

                Thanks for the recommendation. What do you mean in terms of effectiveness? Was noise levels, temperature, adhesion or all of the above?
                Noise level reduction is nowhere near as good as the stock material. Temperature less so but you have the interior carpet helping you out there. It adhered fine to the tunnel metal.

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                • #9
                  You can drill some fastener holes through the insulation into the sheet metal and secure with metal or plastic fender washers and screws. You'll be exposing untreated sheet metal so you might want to get a bit of sealant on the hole. I did this with my new insulation near the giubo where it typically sags.

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